Community Mass – Divine Mercy Sunday

Please join us to celebrate the 2nd Sunday of Easter, of Divine Mercy, on Sunday, April 11th.

Note the return to our usual Mass times below:

Today’s readings and hymns are available to download below.

  • Please follow the instructions of the ushers, and observe all of the posted health precautions so that we can continue to worship together safely.
  • Hymnals, bulletins, and other handouts will not be available at the church. Please download on your phone or tablet, or bring your own missal.
  • Support our Parish – Please contribute to our General Collection online here.
  • Help us support the Easter Collection for Retired Priests

Divine Mercy Sunday – Building Up the World

In Christ and Divine Mercy, image of Divine Mercy apparition to Sr. Faustina Kowalska, Stained Glass Inc. (CC license)

Fr. Smith’s Commentary on the Second Reading
Divine Mercy Sunday
1 John 5:1-6
April 11, 2021

From now until the Seventh Sunday of Easter (May 16) our first readings will be from the Acts of the Apostles, our second readings from the first letter of St. John and (with one exception) our gospels from St. John. We will take this opportunity to look at the 1st Letter of John with special care. It will bring the entire message of the community which formed around the Beloved Disciple into greater clarity. We must begin by noting that this is the work of a community over time. The Gospel and Letters of John were composed as the community developed and they mark the signs of this growth. Scholars have detected four stages:

(1) The “Beloved Disciple” (usually referred to as John) – This Gospel many times remarks on the close relationship between Jesus and the beloved disciple and that he may have lived longer than the other disciples. He was an eyewitness to the events that the Gospel relates. This Gospel shows greater familiarity with Jewish customs and rituals and the geography of the Holy Land than the others. That the Gospel of John and other writings can be traced to an eyewitness is more than plausible as is its connection to a charismatic figure as we can assume the beloved disciple was.

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Easter Sunday – Homily (Fr. Smith)

A poet wrote that it is not where I breathe but where I love, I live. The risen Jesus has brought us to a world where everything revolves around God’s love and we can live life to the full.  

This world begins at the tomb. Jesus had been placed in it hurriedly and now for him to be buried as a Jew he must be anointed with oil. Three women come to do this, but they know that a stone has been rolled over the entrance to prevent animals from defiling a corpse and they will not be able to move it.  

They loved Jesus so much that they would risk the wrath of the authorities by tending to his body. This is true love they did not think that he was alive and could no longer do anything for them. Yet although four times in Marks’s gospel Jesus says that he will rise from the dead his disciples, even these brave women and women are the superior disciples in Mark, do not understand, they expected to find a corpse. 

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Community Mass – Easter Sunday

He Has Risen! Please join us to celebrate Easter Sunday on Sunday, April 4th.

Note the changes to the usual Mass times below:

Today’s readings and hymns are available to download below.

  • Please follow the instructions of the ushers, and observe all of the posted health precautions so that we can continue to worship together safely.
  • Hymnals, bulletins, and other handouts will not be available at the church. Please download on your phone or tablet, or bring your own missal.
  • Support our Parish – Please contribute to our General Collection online here.
  • Help us support the Easter Collection for Retired Priests

Good Friday – Homily (Msgr. LoPinto)

After this, aware everything was now finished in order that the scripture might be fulfilled, Jesus said I thirst. There are many phrases that are contained in the different accounts of the passion,

but perhaps this one stands out because it really reflects what Jesus was intent upon.

It’s a phrase that became part of the writings in her daily in her daily diary of the sainted Mother Teresa.

She often wrote that the feeling that she had was a thirst.

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Easter – The Depth of His Love, The Depth of Our Need

The Disciples Peter and John Running to the Tomb, Eugène Burnand, 1898, Musée d’Orsay
(About this Image)

Fr. Smith’s Commentary on the Second Reading
Easter Sunday
Colossians 3:1–4
April 4, 2021

The readings for Easter Sunday are all from the New Testament. Of the available options, we will look at Colossians 3:1–4. Discussions on Colossians usually become overly concerned if it was written by St. Paul or a disciple. This is of scholarly interest, but we need to remember that no matter who wrote it, Colossians is still inspired. It speaks to matters which are eerily relevant to our own day.

We should look at “Why a letter to the Colossians?” and “Who were the philosophers who are being opposed?”

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