2nd Sunday of Advent – Homily (Fr. Smith)

The first part of today’s gospel is far from riveting.  A list of obscure Roman officials and a Jewish priest is not as compelling as the ministry of John the Baptist. Yet it is extremely important, and it is necessary for us to examine it closely because it tells us that Luke is writing a history of a Jewish prophet, indeed 2 prophets. 

He first outlines the political geography of Jesus’ world, noting the date through the reign of the emperor and the emperor’s representative in every place that affected Jesus. He then adds the current local religious leader. This is critical. He does not begin with “once upon a time” or “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away”.  Luke is writing history and we must read his gospel and the acts of the apostles accordingly.

This is not a myth or legend which may give us a window into truth such as the first chapters of the book of Genesis. It tells the story of a real person, Jesus, who lived at a certain place, Judea and Galilee, who preached a message, the coming of the kingdom of God, and who was killed for this teaching. Should any of these not be factual, then Luke is either a dupe or a liar. His concept of writing history would not be the same as ours. The speeches for instance will all sound the same, because he will make them conform to certain rules. They are not verbatim, and would not be expected to be. But his audience knew what was important and could not be made up for any reason. His immediate audience would have especially understood that if Jesus did not literally die and rise this book is meaningless at best and malicious at worst.  

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Community Mass – 2nd Sunday of Advent

On Sunday, December 5, 2021, join us in person or online for the 2nd Sunday of Advent.

Our current Mass times are:

  • 9 AM EST – Morning Mass – in person
  • 11:15 AM EST – Community Mass – in person and livestreamed online
  • 7 PM ESTEvening Mass – in person

    Watch the video live or on replay via YouTube Live by clicking in the window above.
    Subscribe to our YouTube channel at youtube.com/stcharlesbklyn .

The readings will be from Cycle C.

Entrance: The King Shall Come When Morning Dawns – 414

Readigs and Responsorial Psalm – 996

Offertory: Christ, Be Our Light! – 590

Communion: Ready the Way

Closing: Sing Out, Earth and Skies! – 577

The Gather 3rd Edition Hymnal/Missals are available for use in the church – pick one up as you enter and return it after Mass. Instructions on how to use the hymnal missal are available here: https://www.stcharlesbklyn.org/hymnal-missal/ .

Today’s readings are also available to read online at the USCCB website https://bible.usccb.org .

1st Sunday of Advent – Homily (Fr. Smith)

Advent is an unexpected and unwanted liturgical season. Yet, although no early Christian would have created Advent it is necessary, helpful, and potentially joyful. Let us look at why.  

Advent means coming. It is often assumed that this is the coming of Jesus at his birth. This is less than half correct. Most of the prayers and readings for Advent are directed to Jesus’ return. Advent is divided into two sections “Early Advent” which extends from today to Dec 16th. Here, the attention is clearly on the Jesus’ return and the establishment of the Kingdom. As you have probably noticed, the Sunday readings for the last two weeks have also dwelt with this theme. The Nativity is emphasized only from the 17th to the 25th of December. We are clearly being called to look at and for the return of Jesus.  

Why? 

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Robin Curtis – Funeral

We are sad to announce the passing of long-time parishioner and lector Robin Curtis. Funeral arrangements are:

Wake: Thursday, December 2 10:30 AM – 12 PM at St. Charles.
Funeral: Thursday 12 PM at St. Charles.
Burial: Greenwood Cemetery, immediately following.

Eternal rest grant onto her, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon her.

The funeral Mass will be livestreamed for those who cannot attend in person. You can watch the Mass live or on replay via YouTube by clicking play on the video below.

Community Mass – 1st Sunday of Advent

Advent begins on Sunday, November 28, 2021 – join us in person or online.

Our current Mass times are:

  • 9 AM EST – Morning Mass – in person
  • 11:15 AM EST – Community Mass – in person and livestreamed online
  • 7 PM ESTEvening Mass – in person

    Watch the video live or on replay via YouTube Live by clicking in the window above.
    Subscribe to our YouTube channel at youtube.com/stcharlesbklyn .

The new liturgical year begins today – the readings will be from Cycle C.

Entrance: O Come, Divine Messiah! – 401
Readings and Responsorial Psalm – 993
Offertory: Creator of the Stars of Night – 420
Communion: Taste and See – 930
Closing: City of God – 766

The Gather 3rd Edition Hymnal/Missals are available for use in the church – pick one up as you enter and return it after Mass. Instructions on how to use the hymnal missal are available here: https://www.stcharlesbklyn.org/hymnal-missal/ .

Today’s readings are also available to read online at the USCCB website https://bible.usccb.org .

Homily – Christ the King (Fr. Smith)

Today we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King. It was created by Pope Pius XI, Achille Ratti, in 1925 and to understand the feast you will need to know the Man. Let me tell you a story about him that occurred earlier that year.

The dust had settled from the First World War and revealed a changed world, every institution including the church was uncertain how to proceed, indeed, how to connect with people. Since the 1890s the Popes had realized that the rise of industrialism and the form of capitalism that supported it as well as the socialism and communism that opposed it had created unprecedented problems for a church that depended upon monarchial government and agricultural production. Pope Leo 13th in 1891 recognized the need for a just wage and the right of working people to organize to provide for a dignified and productive life. He sought to bring the church to accept this new reality and to embrace clerks, merchants and most importantly factory workers.

His call was not heeded by most bishops in the world and indeed was at some times and places actively resisted. The split widened between working people and the Church. One exception to this not very benign neglect was a young Belgian Priest, Joeph Cardijn. He not only saw the need to minister to young workers but to minister with them. He formed groups which eventually became the Young Christian Workers not only for catechetical instruction and prayer but for education and social action. He believed that they should control their own funds and decide on their own projects and causes. The motto of the group, which was taken up by Pope St John 23rd in the Second Vatican Council and Pope Francis in Fratelli Tutti was “See, Judge Act.”

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